Via Positiva: A Time to Embrace — Embrace Insight

By: JUBILEE! Minister Candace Chellew-Hodge

Ah yes, Jesus, just like Galileo and those other great people through history, knew what it felt like to be misunderstood. And nowhere was he misunderstood the most but by the people who knew him best — those good men and women of his hometown of Nazareth.

In today’s passage (Mark 6:1-6), we find our guy teaching at the local synagogue on the Sabbath, expounding on the scriptures and sharing his insights with those who meant the most to him.

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Via Positiva: A Time to Embrace — Embrace Trust

By: JUBILEE! Minister Bill Harris

Trust is a decision. A decision that then triggers trusting feelings. We spend a great deal of time living on emotional auto-pilot, not even conscious of the decisions about trust and distrust we’re making. The payoff is we don’t have to grapple with uncertainty and face or feel our fear. It also makes it easy to play the victim when things go badly.

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Via Positiva: A Time To Embrace — Embrace Freedom

By: JUBILEE! Minister Candace Chellew-Hodge

Addiction is “a state of compulsion, obsession, or preoccupation that enslaves a person’s will and desire. Addiction sidetracks and eclipses the energy of our deepest, truest desire for love and goodness.” — Gerald May, Addiction and Grace

In our Jesus story (Matthew 5:38-42), we find our guy pointing out some very serious addictions that the people of his day suffered from. They were addicted to the law, namely the Jewish laws that demand retribution — laws that demand sacrifice and are devoid of mercy.

Even today, we have an addiction to retribution. We still like the idea of an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, a life for a life. That’s the basis of laws such as the death penalty. You take a life, you pay for it with your own.
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Via Positiva: A Time to Embrace — Embrace Wonder

By: JUBILEE! Minister Candace Chellew-Hodge

In our Hebrew scripture (Job 38:1-11), we arrive at the end of Job’s long trial of suffering. After losing his children, his livelihood and anything else in this world that ever meant anything to him, he’s challenging God to explain it all to him.

Job asks the ultimate, “Why me?” question throughout this book, and his friends are happy to line up and explain to him why bad things happen to good people.

The friends are well meaning and their reasons for Job’s suffering are all too familiar even to our modern ears. One tells him, “Job, you screwed up. You pissed God off in a big way, and now you’re paying for it!”

Job argues that he’s done nothing wrong. He’s been living the best way he knows how and can’t figure out one thing that he’d done, said, thought or left undone or unsaid that would tick God off this badly.

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